Inspiring Wonder, Love and Careful Attention

My deep thanks go to Maggi Dawn, who inspired this blog post, and also the first post I ever made.

Reading again an extract from Beginnings and Endings – Maggi Dawn:

As every parent, every child and every lover knows, you need to be able to look your beloved straight in the face. Someone you speak to but never encounter physically is always remote and ‘other’. The incarnation is God’s resolution: God, who is ‘other’, becomes one of us. We cannot look into the face of God but we can look into the face of Jesus. The baby in the manger has no need to say ‘Fear not’. Despite the fact that most first-time parents go through moments of panic, babies are not terrifying or awesome in the same way that angels are. The knowledge of their complete dependence of us is frightening, but not the child itself, and the child in the manger does not inspire terror through his superior and his unfamiliar power. Instead, he inspires wonder, love and careful attention, as he simply requires that we love him. Elizabeth Goudge once wrote that ‘if a very important person frightens you, he is not great, he only thinks he is’. Truly great people rise above the need to impress others with how great they are. Thus God, in Jesus Christ, completes the picture of his love to us – the paradox being that the awe-inspiring, utterly transcendent God can also look upon us from the face of a helpless child.

I greatly loved reading Beginnings and Endings last year on loan from a friend of mine, and I was told by her that she had read it together with several others to enhance their inspiration and learning from it. I took the time to type out my favourite chapter last year, and it featured on the first post I ever made on this blog! As Maggi Dawn put it, Christmas carries fear, worship and wide-eyed wonder.
As we look into the eyes of one other and find Jesus there, as we find Christ in so many moments of our lives, as we hold one other in a hug, God embraces us. God is in our lives in so many beautiful ways. And is always there. As a Father holding His arms out wide when we need comfort, when we need to remember how much care and love He shares with us. As a Brother, a Son of Man, ready also to hold His arms out for us, and to hold our hand and walk down long roads at our side, giving us guidance and showing us the most perfect way to live on earth. As a Holy Spirit, an encompassing inward hug, a Spirit which lives inside us, and outside us, in everything that has breath… ruach. God’s beauty in this world surrounds us. And as loved ones now await for us in the Kingdom of Heaven, we continue on in this world for a time to learn, to grow, to experience earth and companionship, and to help one another to bring love into lives, to bring light, happiness, and ultimately, to with one another experience Heaven on our beautifully shared earth in the moments where we come truly alive. To bring peace.

There are moments when we fear. When we are afraid of losing something or someone from our company on earth, when we are afraid of going down the road not knowing what awaits for us around the corner, when we are afraid of being alone. But in the face of a baby, there is no need to say fear not anymore.
…the paradox being that the awe-inspiring, utterly transcendent God can also look upon us from the face of a helpless child.
There are moments of worship. When we worship God as a child in a manger, when we worship God as transcendent, when we worship God as immanent.
…the paradox being that the awe-inspiring, utterly transcendent God can also look upon us from the face of a helpless child.
There are moments of wide-eyed wonder. When our eyes open wide and our jaws drop in awe, and we see God’s love.

As Christmas approaches let us remember when God tells us to not be afraid. Let us remember God in the face of Jesus Christ, baby in Bethlehem, and let us remember that …he inspires wonder, love and careful attention, as he simply requires that we love him.

I leave you with again an extract from Beginnings and Endings:

It means that God, whom we traditionally think of as all-powerful, becomes a powerless child who would rather relinquish his power than live in splendid isolation from those whom he loves. And ultimately, the meaning of Christmas is that God loves us so much, he cannot bear to live without us: a formula that takes a few seconds to say but suggests a depth of love that takes a lifetime to understand.

Happy Christmas.

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This entry was posted in *Favourites*, Book Quotes, Christianity, Deep Thinking, Love. Bookmark the permalink.

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